The Do’s & Don’ts of Shared Media Products: How to Run a Successful Campaign

Avatar

Do: use precision targeting to select the homes you want to target when undertaking a shared media products marketing campaign. The most important thing to do is to know who you have on your mailing list. You may think that the design of your message is the most important feature of a successful shared media products campaign, but this does not ring true. If you have a list that is the best possible you are likely to get a response that is ten times better than a poorly put together list. To be put quite simply your mailing list is your market – so you must get it right. When compiling this list you should draw names of customers from people who have purchased your products before or even shown an interest in your products through other means of advertising you have used. You don’t want to end up trying to sell ice to an inuit. You should know the areas your best customers to target are, and with precision targeting select exactly the best postal code zones to target.

 

Do: perform a test run of your direct mailing before you send out your advertising product to all you have compiled on your list. Big businesses do this all the time. Don’t put all your budget into a shared media products run unless you are confident it will go well. Confidence comes from data and experience.

 

Do: use a sales letter in the direct mailing package. This sales letter should be set apart from any product descriptions you have included in your shared media products package as it has been found to be the lynch pin for getting customers to respond. A test conducted by one business found that their 1st package which was offering a tool catalogue for $1 included a sales letter accompanied by a reply form. The 2nd package included a double post-card. The 2nd package received three times the response than the 1st package. The reason it seems that a sales letter is so successful is that it makes the communication package appear more personal.

 

Do: think about the benefits and features of your product. If your target market is the main street consumer, he or she will preview the benefits of the product before considering its features while when marketing your product to other businesses the features take priority. Sometimes, both have to be included, for example when marketing a tablet to just about anyone the features tend to draw people just as much as the benefits.

 

Do: integrate your print advertising to web advertising, radio advertising and any other advertising you might be doing. This way you can fully grasp the success directly from your mail plus all the alternative ways your customer will continue to search for your products, services or brand outside of going straight to your store. Track web visitors from your mail with a unique website URL just for them, add a tracking phone number to your ads and search for any other way to measure the success of your campaign. You should be in their physical mailbox and digital mailbox, and everywhere else you can be!

 

Don’t: forget to include an offer. Including an offer in your shared media products campaign really attracts attention. This could include a free product sample, free consultation, free brochure, free trial or a free demonstration. The supplying of the offer should be presented in such a way that the potential customer hurriedly falls for it and requests it from you. Any offers should be promoted through social media and throughout the web.

 

Don’t: leave your strongest point to last in your sales letter, as the reader will throw the mail into the trash can before getting to your best sales point. Some good openers for sales letters could try to arouse curiosity in the reader about the product, or even an amazing statistic about the benefits of owning the product or using the service and putting your offer in the 1st sentence often attracts attention. Your selling point should be front and center, in your headline and featured above the fold on your ad.

 

Leave a Comment

prepare your business for the holiday rushintegrated direct mail campaign